Rapid Improvement Seven Years After Stroke, February 2017

Disclaimer: Individual results vary, not all patients respond. Additional doses may be necessary to maintain the clinical response. Treatment for these indications is innovative (“off-label”). Please see the Terms of Use. The method of off-label treatment utilized is a patented invention of the INR. Copyright 2017 INR PLLC, all rights reserved.

Rapid Improvement in Gait 8 years after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury at the INR, March 2017

Traumatic Brain Injury 8 years prior, gait improvement after treatment at the INR in Boca Raton in March 2017.

Disclaimer: Individual results vary, not all patients respond. Additional doses may be necessary to maintain the clinical response. Treatment for these indications is innovative (“off-label”). Please see the Terms of Use. The method of off-label treatment utilized is a patented invention of the INR. Copyright 2017 INR PLLC, all rights reserved.


Scientific literature provides support for the scientific rationale. See:

Perispinal Delivery of CNS Drugs

Perispinal.Delivery.coverMay 2, 2016 (Los Angeles, Boca Raton): On April 27, 2016, the peer-reviewed review article entitled, Perispinal Delivery of CNS Drugs, by Edward Tobinick MD, published online in the scientific journal CNS Drugs. The article published in print in the June issue of the journal. The abstract of the article states:

Perispinal injection is a novel emerging method of drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). Physiological barriers prevent macromolecules from efficiently penetrating into the CNS after systemic administration. Perispinal injection is designed to use the cerebrospinal venous system (CSVS) to enhance delivery of drugs to the CNS. It delivers a substance into the anatomic area posterior to the ligamentum flavum, an anatomic region drained by the external vertebral venous plexus (EVVP), a division of the CSVS. Blood within the EVVP communicates with the deeper venous plexuses of the CSVS. The anatomical basis for this method originates in the detailed studies of the CSVS published in 1819 by the French anatomist Gilbert Breschet. By the turn of the century, Breschet’s findings were nearly forgotten, until rediscovered by American anatomist Oscar Batson in 1940. Batson confirmed the unique, linear, bidirectional and retrograde flow of blood between the spinal and cerebral divisions of the CSVS, made possible by the absence of venous valves. Recently, additional supporting evidence was discovered in the publications of American neurologist Corning. Analysis suggests that Corning’s famous first use of cocaine for spinal anesthesia in 1885 was in fact based on Breschet’s anatomical findings, and accomplished by perispinal injection. The therapeutic potential of perispinal injection for CNS disorders is highlighted by the rapid neurological improvement in patients with otherwise intractable neuroinflammatory disorders that may ensue following perispinal etanercept administration. Perispinal delivery merits intense investigation as a new method of enhanced delivery of macromolecules to the CNS and related structures.

Note added in July 2016: A related article, entitled “Perispinal Delivery of CNS Drugs: From Corning to Perispinal Etanercept”, published on July 9, 2016, on the Brain Immune Trends website, accessible by clicking here.

The full-text of the article is available by clicking on the link below:

Perispinal Delivery of CNS DrugsEdward Tobinick MD. CNS Drugs. 2016;30(6):469-80. do:10.1007/s40263-016-0339-2, published online 27 April 2016. (Download free full-text PDF).

Welcome to the INR Blog

Welcome to the INR Blog!

This Blog is still in development. The aim of this blog is to add further scientific information to the content of the INR website as soon as it becomes available. If possible in the future postings and comments from website visitors will be enabled. Thank you for your interest.

Edward Tobinick MD

Recent published research results:

Anti-TNF-alpha reduces amyloid plaques and tau phosphorylation and induces CD11c-positive dendritic-like cell in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brains. Shi JQ, Shen W, Chen J, Wang BR, Zhong LL, Zhu YW, Zhu HQ, Zhang QQ, Zhang YD, Xu J. Brain Res. 2010 Oct 21.
Abstract
Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) occurs in the AD brain. Recent clinical studies have shown that the anti-TNF-alpha therapy improves cognition function of AD patients rapidly. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The present study investigates the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of the monoclonal TNF-alpha antibody, Infliximab, on the pathological features of AD in the APP/PS1 double transgenic mice. We found that Infliximab administration reduced the levels of TNF-alpha, amyloid plaques and tau phosphorylation as early as three days after daily injection of 150micrograms of Infliximab for three days. The number of CD11c-positive dendritic-like cells and the expression of CD11c were found to be increased concurrently after Infliximab injection. These data suggested that the CD11c-positive dendritic-like cells might contribute to the Infliximab-induced reduction of AD-like pathology. Further, our results support the use of anti-TNF-alpha for the treatment of AD. Continue reading